Watchdog Group Sues for Emails on Anthony Weiner Laptop

Watchdog Group Sues for Emails on Anthony Weiner Laptop

Watchdog Group Sues for Emails on Anthony Weiner Laptop

Judicial Watch asks federal court to order release of messages on disgraced congressman's computer

A Washington-based nonprofit government watchdog group is suing the Department of Justice (DOJ) for emails the FBI obtained from former Rep. Anthony Weiner’s laptop during its investigation of 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton.

Weiner, a New York Democrat, was married to longtime Clinton aide Huma Abedin.

The discovery of the laptop prompted then-FBI Director James Comey to reopen the investigation days before the 2016 election. Clinton has blamed that — among many other things — for her huge upset loss to President Donald Trump.

“The Anthony Weiner laptop-Clinton email cover-up by the Obama DOJ and FBI is central to uncovering the corrupt politicization of those agencies,” Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton said in a statement Tuesday. “The same FBI that provided cover for Hillary Clinton was going full-bore against then-candidate Trump, and this lawsuit aims to uncover the full truth about that corruption.”

The FBI was investigating Clinton’s use of a private email server she had installed in her home north of New York City when she was secretary of state. Although numerous emails found on that server contained classified information, Comey determined that she did not intend to violate the law and, therefore, should not be charged.

Judicial Watch asked for the emails under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) on Dec. 12, 2016. After the FBI denied the request, Judicial Watch appealed. The agency never acted on the appeal, so the nonprofit group filed a second FOIA request in September of last year.

The group seeks:
  • All records regarding the search of the laptop.
  • All records retrieved from the laptop.
  • All records of communications, emails, text messages and instant chats, sent to or from FBI officials relating to Clinton’s knowledge or possible knowledge of illicit activities involving Weiner.
Weiner (pictured above) resigned from Congress in 2011 after it became public that he was “sexting” with a woman. A second sexting scandal buried his comeback attempt in 2013, when he was running for mayor of New York.

 Read more here

 
Submit source